Illnesses from A to Z


Crohn's disease

Crohn's disease belongs to the group of autoimmune illnesses. The body destroys its own intestinal mucosa due to a malfunction in the immune system. As a result, chronic inflammation occurs that can spread throughout the entire gastro-intestinal tract and is accompanied by fever, diarrhoea and weight loss. Typically, the illness begins in the small intestine, but as part of the episodic progression, all sections of the bowel are often affected as well as the stomach. The complications include fistulas in the intestinal wall and bowel stenosis, which can be life-threatening. The causes of the development of Crohn's disease are still largely unclear, as is the case for all autoimmune illnesses. However, it is certain that not only a fibre-rich diet, but also mental regulation with an avoidance of long-term stress can significantly alleviate the symptoms and halt the development of a new episode. This clarifies the good possibilities of using medicinal mushrooms, which contain a variety of important bioactive substances and often have a generally balancing effect on a physical and mental level.
 

Medicinal mushrooms for Crohn's disease



Hericium
For every form of inflammation of the medicinal mushroom in the digestive tract, Hericium is an important medicinal mushroom. It can promote the regeneration of tissue damage as well as the development of healthy intestinal flora. Hericium is proven to have a positive effect on the mind.

Reishi and Maitake
Both of these medicinal mushrooms can gently regulate malfunctions in the immune system over the long term. The generally revitalising effects of Reishi and Maitake also have a positive effect on Crohn's disease. An anti-inflammatory effect has also been shown for Reishi in studies.

Our suggestions about the usage of medicinal mushrooms is no substitute for treatment from a doctor or alternative practitioner. Medications currently being taken or ongoing treatments should not be stopped without first consulting your doctor or alternative practitioner.